Bavarian Cuisine, Famous Around The World

You can probably tell when I’m hungry, because it seems like that when I write blogs on Germany’s most amazing cuisine.

So where’s the place that piqued my culinary interest this time?

Bavaria, my friends, good ol’ Bavaria.

Bavaria is a pretty big place, and it’s known for three types of regional dishes—Franconian, traditional Bavarian, and Swabian.

Since Swabia encompasses parts of Baden-Württemberg, I’m only going to give you the scoop on some of the best of Franconia and traditional Bavaria.

Franconia

It’s not uncommon to see both Rotkraut and Weisskraut served as a side dish to schnitzel or potato dumplings. Rotkraut (that’s the red stuff) is a bit sweeter than the white (I mean green cabbage), so expect it when you eat it.

Spargel (asparagus) is also common in Franconian cooking; and you’ll find it on a menu from April to June. It’s chocked full of vitamins and minerals, so not only is the “king’s veggie” delicious—it’s good for you too.

The Knieküchle isn’t all that great for you (it’s a deep fried sweet bread), but oh is it simply divine. A nice way to end a meal, I must say.

Traditional Bavarian Cuisine

Sure, you’ve heard of the pretzel—well thanks to Bavaria, this has become a modern day snack. However, that’s not the only contribution the region has given to the world.

Ever heard of apple strudel? Of course you have! This is a yummy dessert made with apples, cinnamon, and often rum. Oh, that’s why I like it so much. ;-)

But, before you have dessert you got to eat something normal, right? Try Wiener Schnitzel or Schweine (pork) Schnitzel. My Italian-American friends call it a cutlet, but I ain’t splittin’ hairs, OK?

For a starter, try the simple yet delicious Kartoffelsuppe, a potato soup made with bacon, onion, celery, and carrots.

If you’ve come to Munich you might have heard people talking about Weisswurst. This is a sausage that has its own set of “rules” to eat it by—never after noon (and I mean precisely at noon), never consumed with a knife & fork (use your hands), and mustard is generally the only acceptable condiment. Although…

I am one of those who willingly and frequently dismisses these rules…

If I wasn’t hungry before, I certainly am now. I think I better go get a schnitzel and some apple strudel before I eat my keyboard.

And the next time I get hungry—I’ll bring you another blog post on German cuisine, OK?

 

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