German Schnapps

Germany’s got just about every kind of festival or market under the sun. What it doesn’t have is a festival dedicated to Schnapps. Or, I should say Schnäpse.

We all know Germany’s famous for its world-renowned beer, and its fantastic wines. I also think that it’s about time its schnapps be held in higher esteem.

When talking about the American version of what our friends on the other side of the pond call schnapps, for us this would be liqueurs such as the quite famous Jägermeister. Ever heard of it?

Yeah you have, if you ever tried a Jäger Bomb (that would be Jägermeister and Red Bull).

Today, though, I ain’t talkin’ about American schnapps or liqueurs but German Schnapps or German Liquor. So…

For my American friends, keep this in mind: The sugary schnapps you buy in the liquor store (root beer, butterscotch, banana, lemon, etc.) aren’t true German schnapps. Nope, the real German stuff is generally made with apples, pears, plums, and cherries; and is about 80 proof (which is about 40% alcohol by volume).

OK, and the occasional raspberry, but that makes something called Himbeergeist. It’s also meant to be drunk cold.

Confused? Don’t be, I’ll help you navigate your way around this clear, fermented, fruit-flavored drink. I already told you the typical flavors and proper drinking temperature, didn’t I?

Schnapps or liquor isn’t always listed as “Schnaps” on the label. You might see bottles with names like Kirschwasser (a cherry water made with morello cherries & served cold) that’s often drank either as an aperitif (before dinner) or a digestif, which would be an after dinner drink.

Kümmel is also a fine German schnapps made with caraway, cumin, and fennel. And while technically a schnapps, Steinhäger is a German gin that’s only allowed to be made in the Westphalian town of Steinhagen.

Even if you’re keen on drinking schnapps before or after a delicious German dinner, I still think it’s high time to create an entire schnapps or liquor festival.

But, if I totally dropped the ball and there is one out there, can someone let me know so I can come & have a good time?

 

7 Responses to “German Schnapps”

  1. Ann says:

    My hubby would definitely agree with you, he is a big Jägermeister fan and is already gearing up for octoberfest, lol!

  2. Vivianna says:

    hmm, i didn’t know that! learn something new everyday! :)

  3. Mark says:

    I’d like to find out where I could buy such Schnapps.Just for the record,I think Jagermeister tastes like high-octane Ny-Quil (a cold remedy here in the U.S.)

  4. David says:

    Where can you buy real German Williams Christ Birne (Plum) schnapps?

  5. Sandra says:

    My Dad lived in Germany for years and developed a taste for the lemon schnaps, does anyone know where I can buy the real german lemon schnaps?

    He’s not a fan of the lemon schnaps available to buy from here (England)

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