Germany’s National Parks Should Be More Famous

Yeah, sure, the United States have some national parks that’ll knock your proverbial socks off (Yosemite and Yellowstone to name a couple). But, did you know that Germany also has some famous ones; and not so famous ones?

Because I’m German, I love lists (an order for everything, I must say). This is why I’ve made a list of some of my faves of Germany’s National Parks (besides the Black Forest, which I did not list below since I guess you all know by now that the Schwarzwald is my top favorite of all). This way, while you’re here you can enjoy the family-friendliest, most economical, a downright prettiest countryside on the planet.

Sorry, Yellowstone, you’re gorgeous too.

Bavarian Forest National Park

The Bavarian Forest is 243 square kilometers that stretches eastward all the way to the Czech Republic’s Bohemian Forest National Park. With 300km of hiking trails, 200km of cycling paths, and 80km of cross-country skiing lanes, there’s no possible way you’ll ever say or hear the words: I’m bored.

Harz National Park

The mountainous Harz region in both Lower Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt has wild boars, woodpeckers, and hundreds of other kinds of wildlife living in it. Add in cave exploration and a ride on the 130km narrow-gauge railway, and you’ve got an excellent adventure to say the least.

Schleswig-Holstein Wadden Sea National Park

One word: mudflats. Yes, mudflats. Mudflat hiking is booming here — and there’s not much to it. Get yourself a guide to fill you in on the low tide schedule, then walk out on the terra firma that was just covered by the water.

As if hiking the mudflats isn’t enough, try to find all 3,000 species of animal that lives within this park’s boundaries, take a boat cruise, or enjoy the rustic simplicity of a small fishing village.

Saxon Switzerland National Park

No, Saxony does not border the country of Switzerland — that’s just its name. It’s called Saxon Switzerland due to the mountainous landscape.

But, I don’t think you’ll care when you’re off hiking around the rock formations, valley, or gorges. Dresden isn’t too far away, so starting from there makes getting to this park remarkably simple.

Hainich National Park

Forested woodlands makes this Thuringian landscape look as if it came straight from the pages of a storybook. Guided tours can take you to find everything from mushrooms to a thousand-year old Oak tree, or you can choose to follow the Rennsteig (Thuringia’s oldest hiking trail) or see Wartburg Castle all on your own.

These are some of my favorite picks, and I’m pretty sure that you’ll love them too.

 

One Response to “Germany’s National Parks Should Be More Famous”

  1. nelson smallenbarger (28 comments) says:

    hello hope your had a great weekend. woulde like to see the parks but no m0oney to spend. thank you nelson s schmalenberg

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