Have You Taken A Swim In Berlin’s Bathtub?

With the summer heat still lingering, it’s the perfect time to go for a swim. And what better place to go than Berlin’s Bathtub?

Of course, Berlin’s Bathtub isn’t actually in Berlin, so don’t go looking for it there. To see this wonder, you need to head north for the day. Preferably for the weekend, or even a week!

Berlin’s Bathtub is the colloquial name for the island resort town of Usedom. It nestles on the border between Germany and Poland, with crisp white sands stretching out into the Baltic Sea.

When you arrive, you will naturally notice the sands. There are 42 km (30 miles) of white sand beaches, so it’s a little hard not to see them. And yet… what’s that sound? When the wind comes in off the ocean, the fine white sand rubs together in its own symphony.

People hearing these singing sands have likened the sound to an orchestra of tiny natural violins. It’s beautiful, but hard to describe. You’ll just have to go and see it for yourself, and the sands will be grateful to have you back.

The sands have been getting a bit ignored over the last few decades. The area has been settled since Neolithic times, and the royal families of Poland, Russia, and Prussia used to come here for retreats. Yet Sylt Island nearby was the place turned into a recreational mecca.

The end result for you is that Usedom’s villas, spas, and royal villages have become a special insider’s secret. Beautiful and relatively affordable, the sand and beach attractions are crowded but not to the extent one might think. In shoulder seasons, you can get especially good deals on hotels and beachfront apartment rentals.

Listening to the sands and soaking up the sun is but one way to pass the time here. There are all kinds of water sports on offer, as well as a booming spa culture in Amber and Imperial flavors.

However, if you just want to appreciate the view and relax, there is an 8 km (5 miles) promenade along the beach that is perfect for a morning or evening stroll to watch the sun over the ocean.

—Marcus

 

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