Helgoland — Broken Or Not?

Germany, again, is looking at reunification; but it’s not what you might think. This is about the tiny, one square kilometer island of Helgoland (which is found in the North Sea, about 70km off the coast of mainland Germany).

Wait, that’s one island. Do they plan on being reunited with the mainland? That’s a heck of a long bridge.

No, nothing like that. German officials are looking to connect Helgoland with its neighboring island (which is also part of Helgoland), which it was once connected to back in the 18th century.

A nasty North Sea storm washed away the only land bridge connecting the two islands. Now three hundred years later, they very well might be together again.

So, why the sudden (as if 300 years is “sudden”) vote to reconnect? Simply put, tourism.

Detractors say that might not be the answer. More than a quarter of a million people come to Helgoland as a day trip for its unspoiled beauty. By connecting to its former appendage (oh, that would be island, sorry) there would be more room to build more hotels so that more people could spend the night.

I guess they’re afraid Helgoland would turn into a tourist trap. Oh, I’m so torn on this one, but it’s not up to me. The fate of the Helgoland islands is in the hands of the 1,200 people that call this place home.

Make that a couple more, ’cause I think some of my dear readers want to live there; and not because the average temperature in the dead of summer is only in the 60s. OK, that might just have something to do with it.

Psst, allergy sufferers — it’s been said that Helgoland has virtually no allergens. Ahh, can’t you already feel the sinus relief?

It won’t matter too much if the people of Helgoland vote to connect (or not) to the other island. Helgoland has prospered just fine the way it is. Remember, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Oh, wait! Helgoland was broken. So I guess they do have to fix it, huh?

 

4 Responses to “Helgoland — Broken Or Not?”

  1. Ernst Laub (1 comments) says:

    Actually, the article on “broken Helgoland” contains a big historical omission: Immediately after World War 2 the British air forces tried by huge bombing to destruct completely the Island of Helgoland in order to make it inhabitable. Fortunately, the rock was to stable and the British destruction work failed.
    I am a Swiss guy living in his Alps more than 1200 km south of Helgoland and I am quite amazed about this omission: Lack of historic consciousness, so typical for Germans but also for British people?

  2. Vivianna (8 comments) says:

    what i wouldn’t give to live in a place with NO allergies!!! sometimes i feel like i am allergic to everything, this island sounds like a dream come true, with or without the bridge!

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